China Pollution

Another public uprising forces hand of government

(July 31, 2012) A large public demonstration in the city of Qidong over a planned industrial waste pipeline has led to its shutdown by city officials. The Qidong protest, prompted by environmental concerns, follows other demonstrations against projects elsewhere. What is particularly of note: although the Qidong rally provoked violence similar to that of an intense protest in Shifang City several weeks earlier, state media has been unusually mild in its response by comparison. The reaction appears to echo a growing mood for change sweeping the country as China approaches a once-in-a-decade leadership transition this year.

By Reuters, this article first appeared in the Globe and Mail on July 30, 2012

China paper blames government decisions for violent pollution protest

Even state mouthpieces are speaking out. The People’s Daily writes: “Being a responsible government means to make oneself independent of the specific entanglements of economic interests and become the implementor of the public interest, balancer of economic interests,” it said.

“At the same time (a responsible government should) give the masses a normal pathway to air demands for their rights, establish an open and transparent decision-making mechanism and create an inclusive environment for public opinion.”

Bad decision-making was the main reason for a violent environmental protest in eastern China at the weekend, a state newspaper said in an unusually mild reproach stance after thousands of residents ransacked offices and overturned cars.

Chinese officials cancelled an industrial waste pipeline project on Saturday after the violence in the city of Qidong, the latest in a string of pollution protests across the country.

Similar scenes of violence sparked by environmental fears played out earlier this month in the town of Shifang, in Sichuan province, highlighting the social tensions China faces as it approaches a leadership transition this year.

Authorities are especially worried about maintaining social stability as they balance economic growth and the fallout from environmental pollution.

“An irrational decision-making process is the main reason why the Shifang and Qidong governments experienced mass incidents,” the normally hawkish Global Times said.

It added that the two governments should not be strapped with total blame, because they lacked guidance on handling such cases and had to react to competing pressures to maintain stability and respond to the public outcry.

In a development likely to cause concern in Beijing, some demonstrators in Qidong said they were inspired by the events in Shifang, where the protests were widely seen as having forced the local government to cancel a refinery project.

The spread of a “Shifang-Qidong Model” of violent protest would damage social stability “and present an unprecedented challenge to China’s future development”, the Global Times warned.

“Now is a good opportunity with these classic cases of Shifang and Qidong to undertake serious reforms within the system,” it said.

The People’s Daily, the ruling Communist Party’s mouthpiece and the Global Times’ parent publication, applauded the local government’s decision to permanently scrap the offending project that planned to dump waste water from a paper factory into the sea near Qidong.

It said officials should reflect on recent conflicts and consider the question of how to foster rational interaction between governments and the people to avoid “irrational emotions” and “extreme behaviour”.

“Being a responsible government means to make oneself independent of the specific entanglements of economic interests and become the implementor of the public interest, balancer of economic interests,” it said.

“At the same time (a responsible government should) give the masses a normal pathway to air demands for their rights, establish an open and transparent decision-making mechanism and create an inclusive environment for public opinion.”

News update 

Japan’s Oji Paper resumes output at China plantCanadian Business, July 31, 2012

Oji Paper, the owner of the factory targeted by protesters in Qidong, said earlier in a statement that the proposed pipeline was meant to discharge already treated water fully compliant with government standards.

“The Nantong Oji factory’s water quality management system is very strict,” the company said. “Our company puts a high priority on protecting the environment.”

The water discharge project was part of a planned expansion for the Jiangsu Oji Paper Nantong Mill, which began output in early 2011 with an annual capacity of 400,000 tons, according to the company’s website.

It is unclear if the expansion will go ahead now that the sewage pipeline planned for Qidong has been cancelled.

 

Learn More:

 Pollution protesters clash with Police in China (July 28, 2012) – Channel News Asia, courtesy of 154th Media

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1 reply »

  1. It’s revealing to hear about the internal workings of Chinese life! There is an international aspect that we in the northeastern USA & eastern Canada see eg Hydro-Quebec had a large role in promoting the Three Gorges ‘project’. This past weekend in Burlington VT at the gathering of eastern governors & eastern Premiers there were Chinese representatives as special guests. They are international players but tend to avoid the spotlight. Jim Higgins

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