Review of seismic-hazard issues associated with the Auburn Dam project, Sierra Nevada foothills, California

The potential for reservoir-induced seismicity, which is the triggering of earthquakes by the physical processes that accompany the impoundment of large reservoirs, was recognized during the seismic hazard studies for the original Auburn Dam. It remains an important issue for the present project because of the potential to increase the probability of earthquakes near the dam.

The world's biggest hydroelectric project

Half a world away from Canada, a hydroelectric project like no other is underway on China’s Yangtze River. Water from the world’s third-longest river will eventually be harnessed by the planet’s largest hydroelectric project, the Three Gorges Dam. A Canadian company financed a study on the viability of the dam long before construction began; a study heavily criticized by Toronto-based advocacy group Probe International. Now, with work underway, more Canadian companies see big opportunities with the project.

A troubling deposit at World Bank

(November 29, 1995) For 5O years government guarantees have allowed the World Bank and its sister development banks to amass the world’s riskiest loan portfolios. Three months ago, the weakest of these sisters, the African Development Bank, was downgraded. And now for the first time, the World Bank admits that many of its own loans can’t be paid back.

A troubling deposit at World Bank

(November 25, 1995) For 5O years government guarantees have allowed the World Bank and its sister development banks to amass the world’s riskiest loan portfolios. Three months ago, the weakest of these sisters, the African Development Bank, was downgraded. And now for the first time, the World Bank admits that many of its own loans can’t be paid back.

Evildoers sentenced for damaging Three Gorges project

A recent radio broadcast from China has reported that opponents of the massive Three Gorges dam were arrested in October and face up to 20 years in prison. The news report, from the Hubei People’s Broadcasting Station, calls the dissidents "evildoers" and accuses them of damaging power facilities, "indulging in swindling and robbery, hindering the performance of public affairs, provoking disputes and spreading obscene videotapes."