Category: Aid to Africa

Ethiopia aid diverted for rebel arms in 1980s: BBC

(March 4, 2010) Millions of dollars of international aid for victims of the mid-1980s famine in Ethiopia was diverted to rebels to buy weapons in the African country, a BBC investigation reported Wednesday.

Advertisements

Foreign aid takes another blow–this time in Australia

(March 3, 2010) Criticism of the high salaries being offered to contractors working with AusAID, Austrialia’s national aid agency, is the latest example of the increased scrutiny facing aid agencies around the world. The criticism comes after a recent audit showed that a number of aid workers are earning more money than the country’s Prime Minister. And they’re doing so tax-free.

Corruption and Bribery as a Way of Life in Africa

(October 26, 2009) Corruption happens at many different levels of bureaucracy, and has become a way of life. According to Transparency International, in Africa, the informal sector amounts to more than 40 per cent of the economy in many countries, reaching well over 50 percent in Nigeria and Tanzania. The lack of legal protection and the desire to dodge regulations makes the informal sector easy prey for extortion and the solicitation of bribes by corrupt officials.

African leaders call for the DIY approach

(June 6, 2009) As the economic crisis continues to work its way across the globe, the plight of African countries has been used as a reason for increasing foreign aid to the developing world. But a new tone has taken root amongst lawmakers in Africa, with a number of African leaders saying its time for leaders across the continent to find ways to fix problems without relying so heavily on foreign aid.

Why aid to Africa must stop: Interview with Dambisa Moyo

(May 30, 2009) Born and raised in Zambia but educated at Oxford and Harvard, Dambisa Moyo was an uncommon face as a black woman in the world of high finance. Now, as she makes her way to Canada for a highly anticipated debate on Monday with Stephen Lewis and others at the Munk Debate on Foreign Aid, she spoke with the National Post about her ideas and the hazards of opposing the aid orthodoxy.

Moyo’s confused attack on aid for Africa

(May 29, 2009) Aid critics have recently been blaming aid as the source of Africa’s poverty. This column explains how Africa has long been struggling with rural poverty, tropical diseases, illiteracy, and lack of infrastructure and that the right solution is to help address these critical needs through transparent and targeted public and private investments. This includes both more aid and more market financing.

To aid or not to aid, that is the question

(May 31, 2009) If Africa’s underdevelopment has been compounded mainly by official aid, as the Zambian economist Dambisa Moyo argues in her book “Dead Aid”, then addressing it might be as straightforward as she suggests. Aid could be turned off, African governments would work harder to foster growth and private capital might prove more effective in curbing poverty.

Aiding is Abetting

(April 30, 2009) Dambisa Moyo’s prescription for economic sustainability in Africa—which includes cutting off all aid within five years—might seem insane if the statistics weren’t so grim: despite one trillion dollars in western aid over the past sixty years, the economic lot of the average African has only gotten worse.