Category: EDC

SNC-Lavalin corruption case: new court date set but plea for speedy trial dismissed

(January 28, 2013) India’s Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) told its special court last month that two of the accused in the notorious SNC-Lavalin hydro-dam graft case were “interfering” with the court’s decision to secure the presence of Klaus Triendl, the former vice-president of Canadian engineering giant SNC-Lavalin and the sixth accused in the case. The two accused in question had requested the charge sheet be divided in order to facilitate the speedy trial of those who had already answered the summons of the court in connection with the case. The court has since dismissed their plea, however, saying there was no reason to think that the presence of Triendl could not be obtained within a reasonable time and set April 24, 2013 as the new date to hear the corruption case.

Advertisements

Immunity from scrutiny: Canada’s Access to Information Act hobbles democracy

(January 7, 2013) Canada’s Access to Information Act perversely gives Export Development Canada (EDC) the legal power to keep records of its operations secret, charges Probe International. In its submission to the Office of the Information Commissioner’s review of Canada’s 30-year-old Access to Information Act, Probe International declares it is time to reform the Act and remove EDC’s extraordinary privileges.

Clear water, big fish

(December 12, 2009) Twenty-three hundred kilometres of transmission lines, to be built by Transelec Chile SA (investors include the CPP Investment Board, the British Columbia Investment Management Corp. and Toronto conglomerate Brookfield Asset Management Inc.), would require the world’s longest clear-cut up through the heart of Patagonia’s untouched temperate forests.

Canadians funding destruction of Patagonia forests

(December 9, 2009) A recent article in Pique highlights concerns about the involvement of the Canadian-owned company Transelec in a hydro electric project in Chile’s Patagonia region. The project, which plans to build five dams and 2,300 km of transmission lines with a parallel highway that would pass through 14 legally protected natural areas, has been criticized by environmentalists in the country and around the world, as well as business leaders.